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A Day On Set As An Editorial MUA

Why Editorial Makeup?

My love for natural beauty and clean, classic looks – which are often seen within beauty and fashion magazines, or in portraits of celebrities – drew me towards editorial makeup artistry. To me, there is an appeal in looking at an image, seeing the person highlighted, and not having the beauty of his or her face being overpowered by makeup.

However, when you take a closer look at the image, you also see all the tiny details that build up and make the final image what it is. For example, it may be a soft smoke of a bronze color that effortlessly ties back in with the bronze jewelry being advertised, or the attire being worn.

My husband, Rommel Alleyne, is a photographer. He and I have been working together on several shoots. Over time, we have learned each other’s styles in makeup artistry and photography, and I have learned how makeup application translates on camera.

There is no substitute for the experience gained working on photoshoots! Even when I am not the makeup artist, and work instead as the lighting assistant, I’m still learning. I’ve become more appreciative of the time of day, lighting, and talent positioning – which all play a vital role in the final image.

Working as a makeup artist for editorials also creates networking opportunities with photographers and models alike. One of my favorite editorial shoots was on set with a Barbadian photographer, Joel Brooks, and a Barbadian jazz singer, Kellie Cadogan. Prior to the shoot, we played around with different attire and jewelry, and concluded with two pieces we would with.

Time was limited. By the end of shooting the first look, the crunch was on for the second shooting. The makeup application for the first look was with neutral brown tones, which were transferable to the second photo session. However, I knew that a slight smoke and hint of grey would add to the second piece.

So, I got permission to proceed with the color transition. I felt the time squeeze and needed to work extremely quickly. I did the transition, and looking at the final photos, I’m glad I made that intuitive suggestion. As you’ll see below, the end product was good!


Jazz Singer/Model: Kellie Cadagon. Makeup by Paula Alleyne. Photography by Joel Brooks. Lighting Assist: Rommel Alleyne



A Day on Set

In the world of editorial makeup artistry, working on set can be summed up into one word: “ATTITUDE”. The attitude you have can either make you or break you.

Always have a heart to serve! As the makeup artist, you are but one person within the team.


Time matters! Get to set early to prep your station and be ready for the talent.


Talk! Have an open dialogue with the team, especially with the photographer prior to shooting. As the shooting unfolds, speak with the photographer to ensure the desired look is being achieved.


Include the talent in your discussions. Let the talent inform you of his or her skin type, allergic reactions, and any prior negative experiences with makeup applications.


Understand the overall image to be achieved. Even if adjustments have to be made during the set, and your input is required, ensure that your suggestions are in keeping with the desired look.


Do be professional. Always!


Enjoy the process! Use the experience to meet other professionals, develop your strengths, and identify areas for improvement.





Yoga Instructor/Model: Jo Hamilton. Makeup by Paula Alleyne. Photography by Rommel Alleyne. Lighting Assist: Akinwole Jordan.

The Benefits of Training with QC Makeup Academy

One of the main benefits of obtaining my professional makeup artistry certification with QC Makeup Academy is the mental preparation the school instills in its students. In one of my Business Units, QC spoke about the importance of networking. This can be in the in the form of:

· Volunteering

· Assisting

· Interning

· Job shadowing

· And much more!


When starting out as a makeup artist, providing editorial work will often begin through volunteering. As within any profession, volunteering should never be frowned upon. In the right place, you’ll find that you’ll receive the same positive attitude, energy, and professionalism that would be given to any paid employee.

In addition to the mental preparation encouraged by QC, you’re also taught all of the practical skills needed to thrive as a professional makeup artist. For example, you’ll learn about accurate foundation application, skin and color correction, blending, and understanding the basics of skincare. All of these factors play a crucial role in creating flawless skin, as well as the natural beauty often associated with editorial makeup.


I am currently enrolled within QC Makeup Academy’s updated Master Makeup Artistry Course and am eager to see how they’ve improved upon an already great program. One of my goals is to have my work published within a well-established magazine. I’d also like to work with celebrities.

As you know, one of my most important stances is: “Never stop learning!” I’m looking forward to sharing my experiences in this program with you guys!


Much love,


Paula

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